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Communalism and confusion: towards a clarification of terms in the study of Malaysian politics

The article discusses two terms including communal and communalism which are widely used in academic studies of the political process in Malaysia. The Democratic Action Party (DAP) is the principal opposition party of Malaysia and without it communal politics would not arise. Another political party called Partai Sosialis Rakyat Malaysia considers Barisan Nasional, DAP, and Parti Islam as communal. It is said that communalism elaborates those beliefs which support communal attitudes, orienations, and actions. Author K. J. Ratnam's book "Communalism and the Political Process in Malaya," does not give the clear picture of the word communalism. Rather it focuses on the intricacies of the political process of Malaysia.

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Malaysia: Key Area In Southeast Asia

This article relates the evolution of Malaysia as a free nation and the spirit of national unity that inspires and guides the ideals and outlook of this country. With the growth of nationalism, the desire for independence had already developed in Malaya to such a pitch that unless this fervor was released and expressed in terms of democracy, Communism, with its strong anticolonial overtone, would triumph and all hopes for freedom and independence would be lost. Malaysia is a practical working democracy, and as such its very existence and success are a positive challenge to any further progress by Communism in Southeast Asia.

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Malaysia: Country Report (Political Risk)

This publication discusses the political and economic conditions in Malaysia, as of November 1, 2007. It is predicted that Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi will call for an election which is scheduled in April 2009. In 2007, real gross domestic product (GDP) growth is around 6%. Growth in the country will be affected by inflation.

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The Troubled Birth Of Malaysia

The article focuses on the troubled birth of Malaysia. The Federation of Malaysia is scheduled to come into existence on August 31 of this year by the merger of the existing Federation of Malaya with Singapore, the British colonies of Sarawak and North Borneo and the British-protected Sultanate of Brunei, thus forming a crescent well over a thousand miles long from the borders of Thailand almost to within eyesight of the southernmost Philippine islands. Although many difficulties stand in the way, the British and Malayan governments say categorically that they will not be deterred from pushing the plan through. Some of the difficulties are historical and local, for the new Federation will be a rather arbitrary assemblage of widely separated territories with mixed populations at different stages of development. More important are the objections raised by Indonesia and the Philippines. President Sukarno of Indonesia condemns Malaysia as a colonialist project because it will have a British defense guarantee.

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Davutoglu's Paradigm, Winkel's Epistemé and Political Science in Malaysia

Husserlian phenomenology and its terminology are utilised to justify the sociology of Islam and its essentialist response through the course of transcultural exchanges and sedimentation with the irreconcilable weltanshauung of the West. At the same time, the issue of structure and reliable knowledge is considered through the difficult relationship between revivalist religion and state politics where political legitimacy and the development of institutions is a feature of socio-political fact. Here, Malaysian political culture and democracy is used as an example. It makes out that sociopolitical realities, if not  co-incidental with discourses of reliable knowledge and moral society, are representations of the conciliation of interests with specific value orientation with regards to alternative conceptions of moral society.

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